The Anomalies, Ep. 1: The Dewlap
The Anomalies, Ep. 1: The Dewlap
The Snow Guardian
The Snow Guardian
Do You Remember? A Dream in the Peruvian Amazon
Do You Remember? A Dream in the Peruvian Amazon
Islands of Creation - Teaser
Islands of Creation - Teaser
A Ghost In The Making: Searching for the Rusty-patched Bumble Bee
A Ghost In The Making: Searching for the Rusty-patched Bumble Bee
Forgotten But Not Gone: The Rusty Patched Bumble Bee
Forgotten But Not Gone: The Rusty Patched Bumble Bee
Think Like a Scientist: Natural Selection in an Outbreak
Think Like a Scientist: Natural Selection in an Outbreak
THINK LIKE A SCIENTIST: Vulcan and the Power of Ideas
THINK LIKE A SCIENTIST: Vulcan and the Power of Ideas
Think Like A Scientist: Boundaries
Think Like A Scientist: Boundaries
Think Like A Scientist: Gorongosa
Think Like A Scientist: Gorongosa
Think Like A Scientist: Inside Alzheimer's Disease
Think Like A Scientist: Inside Alzheimer's Disease
End of Snow - Trailer
End of Snow - Trailer
Protecting Peru's Natural Legacy
Protecting Peru's Natural Legacy
Legends of the Peruvian Coast
Legends of the Peruvian Coast
Legends of the Peruvian Andes
Legends of the Peruvian Andes
Legends of the Peruvian Amazon
Legends of the Peruvian Amazon
Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn
Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn
Snows of the Nile
Snows of the Nile
Pollination in the Highlands Plateau
Pollination in the Highlands Plateau
Biology Road Trips: Snakes in a Cave
Biology Road Trips: Snakes in a Cave
Discover the Tropical Ecology Courses of the Organization for Tropical Studies
Discover the Tropical Ecology Courses of the Organization for Tropical Studies
Research Experiences for Undergraduates
Research Experiences for Undergraduates
Why Do Science?
Why Do Science?
Explaining Speciation Research in Pijin
Explaining Speciation Research in Pijin
Humbled in the Jungle, Episode 1: Fire
Humbled in the Jungle, Episode 1: Fire
Humbled in the Jungle Episode 2: COCONUTS
Humbled in the Jungle Episode 2: COCONUTS
SYMBIOSIS - Episode 1: Symbiotic Super Powers
SYMBIOSIS - Episode 1: Symbiotic Super Powers
Water In The Borderlands
Water In The Borderlands
Saving the Sandhills
Saving the Sandhills
Saving America's Grasslands
Saving America's Grasslands
America's Ranchers: Protectors of our Grasslands
America's Ranchers: Protectors of our Grasslands
Congo Basin Institute (CBI)
Congo Basin Institute (CBI)
The Anomalies, Ep. 1: The DewlapIf you’ve lived in the Southeastern U.S., taken a Caribbean cruise, or stepped inside a middle school science classroom, you’ve probably seen an anole (pronounced uh-NOLE). Anoles are ubiquitous, tree-dwelling lizards of the New World tropics. Their small size, easy care, and interesting behaviors – the traits that make them ideal research subjects for students – have also led some of the world’s top biologists to study anoles. Over the last half-century, hundreds of scientists have published thousands of research studies on these unassuming lizards.An anole’s most intriguing physical attribute is surely its dewlap, a colorful, extendable throat-flap. Among 400+ species of anoles in the Caribbean and Latin America, there are nearly as many dewlap colors. There’s a reason for this dazzling diversity: anoles seem to use dewlap colors to identify members of their own species, thereby avoiding wasted effort in courtship and territoriality. Dr. Manuel Leal, a biologist at the University of Missouri, was drawn to two Puerto Rican anole species that live side by side, yet – paradoxically – appear to share the same dewlap color. The closer he and his colleagues looked at these lizards, the more interesting they became. Through Leal’s work, what began as a curious natural history observation grew into a striking example of natural selection’s role in the evolution of animal signals.
The Snow GuardianFor 40 years, billy barr has lived alone in small cabin in one of the coldest places in the United States – the ghost town of Gothic, CO. With no goals of proving anything, or even knowledge that the climate was changing, billy started collecting data about snowpack to pass the time in his isolated part of the world.When climate researchers at the Gothic-based Rocky Mountain Biological Lab discovered billy’s decades of detailed records, they uncovered clear and compelling evidence of climate change.As someone who has had to learn to survive in such a harsh environment, billy shares some advice about how to move forward on our changing planet.Featuring: billy barrFilmed on location in Gothic, CO
Do You Remember? A Dream in the Peruvian AmazonDiscover one of the most amazing places on earth: the Peruvian Amazon. This short film will take you into the jungles of the Tambopata Province in the Madre de Dios Region of Peru. No one can show you this wild place like Rainforest Expeditions (www.perunature.com). Their specular lodges, friendly staff, and talented guides will bring you face to face with the abundant life and deep beauty of the Peruvian Amazon in comfort and style. On top of the amazing travel experience they offer, Rainforest Expeditions is also working hard with scientists, conservationists, and local tribes to keep this unadulterated part of the world protected. It was an honor working on this film for them. Everyone should visit.All the footage in this film was captured in Tambopata in only nine days. Film by: Day’s Edge ProductionsNarration by: Castulo GuerraMusic Score by: Madelaine German (www.madelainegerman.com)Filmed on a Sony FS5, Sony FS7, Sony A7sii, DJI OSMO, DJI Phantom 3, Canon 5Diii, & Canon and Sigma Lenses4K footage can be licensed by contacting us at info@daysedge.com
Islands of Creation - TeaserIn the jungles of a remote archipelago in the South Pacific, a biologist is attempting to do something Charles Darwin and Ernst Mayr never accomplished: catch evolution in the act of creating new species. Albert Uy is on the verge of an amazing discovery in the Solomon Islands, but there's a threat looming on the horizon. The islands' resources are being exploited, putting all local wildlife at risk. It's a race against time to gather the evidence necessary to prove the existence of a new species before it's lost forever.
A Ghost In The Making: Searching for the Rusty-patched Bumble BeeEveryone has heard about bee declines, but with so much attention focused on domesticated honeybees, someone has to speak up for the 4,000 species of native bees in North America. Natural history photographer Clay Bolt is on a multi-year quest to tell the stories of our native bees, and one elusive species – the Rusty-patched Bumble Bee – has become his ‘white whale.’Traveling from state to state in search of the Rusty-patched, he meets the scientists and conservationists working tirelessly to preserve it. Clay’s journey finally brings him to Wisconsin, where he comes face to face with his fuzzy quarry and discovers an answer to the question that has been nagging him all along: why save a species?A film by Day's Edge Productions, produced in partnership with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and Endangered Species Chocolate. With music by Dan Warren, New West Studios, and Cloud Cult.
Forgotten But Not Gone: The Rusty Patched Bumble BeeIn the United States, there are hundreds of species of plants and animals that are at high risk of extinction, but have no federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. They are "Forgotten, But Not Gone."One of these species is the Rusty-patched Bumble Bee (Bombus affinis). This bee has declined more than 90% across its range in the northeastern and midwestern U.S. A combination of habitat loss, agricultural pesticides, and diseases borne by managed commercial bumble bees is likely to blame. Luckily, in late 2016 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed that this species be listed as an Endangered Species, bringing it one step closer to protection. If the bee is listed, it will be the first North American bee species to gain protection under the Endangered Species Act.The proposed listing opens a 60-day period for the public to provide comments and additional information about the rusty patched bumble bee. The public comment period runs through November 21, 2016. To submit comments or to view documents and comments on the bumble bee listing, visit: regulations.gov/document?D=FWS-R3-ES-2015-0112-0028.
Think Like a Scientist: Natural Selection in an OutbreakThe tragic 2013-2015 Ebola outbreak in west Africa shocked the world. In this episode of Think Like a Scientist, computational genetiicist Pardis Sabeti and disease ecologist Lina Moses bring us to the front line of the epidemic and explain the science behind how this event became the largest ebola outbreak in history. This film was produced by Day's Edge Productions for HHMI BioInteractive and Nautilus Magazine. Check out the full story here.
THINK LIKE A SCIENTIST: Vulcan and the Power of IdeasHave you ever heard of the planet Vulcan? There’s a good chance you haven’t, because it doesn’t exist. In this episode of Think Like A Scientist, MIT professor of science writing and the author of "The Hunt for Vulcan", Tom Levenson, retells the amazing history of planet Vulcan - a story that reveals how the power of an idea can shape the currents of thought, and sometimes, lead researchers down the wrong path. Meanwhile, Harvard experimental particle physicist, Melissa Franklin reflects how the lessons from Vulcan apply to research today, and how, in the end, science manages to get things right.Film by: Day's Edge ProductionsCopyright 2016 Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
Think Like A Scientist: BoundariesHumans construct boundaries -- around our homes, our neighborhoods, and our nations -- to bring order to a chaotic world. But we rarely consider how these boundaries affect other creatures. In this episode of Think Like A Scientist, we meet conservation photographer Krista Schlyer, who has spent the last seven years documenting the environmental effects of the U.S./Mexico border wall, and biologist Jon Beckmann, who studies how man-made barriers influence the movement of wildlife. Schlyer and Beckmann have seen damaging impacts of the border wall firsthand, but they remain optimistic. Humans probably won't stop constructing walls and fences any time soon, but planning our boundaries with wildlife in mind can help prevent these structures from causing environmental harm.Film by: Day's Edge ProductionsCopyright 2016 Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
Think Like A Scientist: GorongosaThis is the first of four episodes in a series we are producing for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute called: Think Like A Scientist. The entire series is is made for distribution on the Nautilus website (Nautil.us). In this episode, we tell the story of Greg Carr and his involvement in the restoration of Gorongosa National Park after its destruction from 30 years of war in Mozambique.The film also features Princeton biologist Rob Pringle, who does research in the park. It is a privilege for Day's Edge to be a small part of the larger effort to tell the story of Goronogosa National Park. This video was a true collaboration between Off The Fence, HHMI, Gorongosa Media Project, Gorongosa National Park, Colleen Cox (animations), and Day's Edge Productions.To see the link on the Nautilus website visit: nautil.us/issue/28/2050/how-to-restart-an-ecosystem
Think Like A Scientist: Inside Alzheimer's DiseaseFor this HHMI and Nautilus Magazine collaboration, journalist Greg O'Brien reveals his struggle living with Alzheimer's Disease as Harvard scientist, Rudy Tanzi, explains the mechanism by which this common disease insidiously robs the identities of those affected. Discover what it means to 'Think Like a Scientist' about Alzheimer's Disease.
End of Snow - TrailerDr. Jane Zelikova is a tropical ecologist living in the mountains of Wyoming and Colorado. She dreams of snow in the summer and tropical forests in the dead of winter. But her snow-capped Fourteeners are changing – no longer bringing the deep winter snowpack once promised.This is a future she and the people of the West can’t run from. What’s a wildly curious, adventurous girl to do? Embark on a journey into the mountains to find the tales of the past, present and future of snow.There will be adventure. Friendships will form. She will dig holes. She will fall down those holes. But like any good story, she will meet inspiring, quirky people and learn a lot along the way.*This film will also be narrated by Morgan Freeman*#notactuallynarratedbymorganfreeman#unlessmorgacaniswillingendofsnow.comfacebook.com/endofsnow
Protecting Peru's Natural LegacyWe were lucky enough to travel with the World Wildlife Fund to Peru in May and June, 2015. Our goal was to create a collection of photographs and a handful of films about Peru's Amazon, Andes and Coast - three of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet. This is a short fundraising film we created for the WWF about a huge initiative that they are working on with other international NGOs and the Peruvian Government to protect Peru's natural legacy forever.For more information about this project, please visit: worldwildlife.org/PeruPlease contact us via daysedge.com if you interested in licensing footage from PeruProduced, filmed and edited by: Day's Edge ProductionsMusic score by: New West Studios (newweststudios.com/)
Legends of the Peruvian CoastJust a few hours south of Peru’s capital, one of the Earth’s driest deserts collides with its most productive ocean. This region is important to the people of Peru and the world, who benefit from its seafood, tourism activities and job opportunities—all which rely on nature. Will we fight to protect this region as threats to its natural resources intensify? This short film for the World Wildlife Fund focuses on the legends of the Peruvian Coast that tell the story of an ecosystem rich with wildlife, culture, threats and hope.We were lucky enough to travel with the World Wildlife Fund to Peru in May and June, 2015. Our goal was to create a collection of photographs and a handful of films about Peru's Amazon, Andes and Coast - three of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet.
Legends of the Peruvian AndesThe windy Andes mountain range is at the core of what defines Peru. It is rich in cultural and natural resources, especially water, but the negative effects of climate change can already be seen here. This short film for the World Wildlife Fund focuses on the legends of the Peruvian Andes that tell the story of an ecosystem rich with wildlife, culture, threats and hope.We were lucky enough to travel with the World Wildlife Fund to Peru in May and June, 2015. Our goal was to create a collection of photographs and a handful of films about Peru's Amazon, Andes and Coast - three of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet.
Legends of the Peruvian AmazonThe animals and cultures of the Peruvian Amazon are so abundant that their voices create a symphony. Yet, as humans rush to exploit the rain forest’s bounty of gold and timber, the future of its wildlife and people hangs in the balance. This short film for the World Wildlife Fund focuses on the legends of the Peruvian Amazon that tell the story of an ecosystem rich with wildlife, culture, threats and hope.We were lucky enough to travel with the World Wildlife Fund to Peru in May and June, 2015. Our goal was to create a collection of photographs and a handful of films about Peru's Amazon, Andes and Coast - three of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet.Watch the Peruvian Andes short here: vimeo.com/135857610Watch the Peruvian Coast short here: vimeo.com/136103352Learn more about what WWF is doing in Peru here: worldwildlife.org/peruProduced, filmed and edited by: Day's Edge ProductionsMusic score by: New West Studios (newweststudios.com/)Narration by: Esteban PetersenTo license Day's Edge Footage from the Peruvian Amazon (we have a lot! 1080 & 4K) find our contact info at: daysedge.com
Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of CornTen thousand years ago, corn didn’t exist anywhere in the world, and until recently scientists argued vehemently about its origins. Today the crop is consumed voraciously by us, by our livestock, and as a major part of processed foods. So where did it come from? Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn tells the story of the genetic changes involved in the transformation of a wild grass called teosinte into corn.  Evidence from genetics supports archeological findings pinpointing corn’s origins to a very particular time and place in Mexico. 
Snows of the NileUganda’s Rwenzori Mountains rise 5000m from the heart of Africa. At their summits are some the only equatorial glaciers on Earth. But these “Mountains of the Moon,” whose very existence caused a sensation in Europe when they were first climbed in 1906, are changing fast. Their glaciers have shrunk by more than 80% in the last century, and scientists predict that the remaining ice will disappear in less than 20 years. The future of the mountains, their remarkable endemic biodiversity, and the Bakonjo people who call them home is uncertain.Snows of the Nile follows Neil Losin and Nate Dappen, two scientists and photographers, on an ambitious expedition to re-capture historical glacier photographs from the Rwenzoris. If they could retrace the steps of the Duke of Abruzzi’s legendary 1906 ascent, brave the Rwenzoris' notoriously unpredictable weather, and re-capture Vittorio Sella's glacier photos, their images would bear witness to a century of climate change.Official Website: snowsofthenile.comFacebook: facebook.com/snowsofthenile
Pollination in the Highlands PlateauPollinators are among the most important insects on Earth. Wherever a wide variety of flowering plants grows, a diverse army of pollinators will be there to ensure that those plants can reproduce.Case in point: the Highlands Biological Station in western North Carolina. HBS is a world-class botanical garden and ecological research facility, with an impressive diversity of pollinators on the property. Learn why pollinators are so important to healthy ecosystems in this short film produced by Day's Edge Productions and Clay Bolt for the Highlands Biological Station.Featuring Dr. Jim Costa and Sonya Carpenter (narrator).Music by New West Studios; animations by Clay Bolt.
Biology Road Trips: Snakes in a CaveDr. Neil Losin and Dr. Nate Dappen are two biologists on a mission: to seek out nature’s most amazing spectacles and share them with people around the world. In the first installment of “Biology Road Trips,” they visit a Puerto Rican cave reputed to be the home of 300,000 bats… and a healthy population of boas that specialize in hunting the bats! If the rumors were true, Neil and Nate wanted to see the snakes in action and capture this unique behavior on film.
Discover the Tropical Ecology Courses of the Organization for Tropical StudiesThis is a short promo film we did about the world-famous Tropical Ecology Courses run by the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) in Costa Rica. Neil and Nate actually met during their 2008 OTS course. The rest is history. This course has shaped the careers of hundreds of biologists. It's a right of passage in Ecology and Evolutionary biology. And, its super fun. Check it out and learn more here: tropicalstudies.orgFilmed and edited by Day's Edge Productions (daysedge.com)Music by: New West Studios (newweststudios.com/)
Research Experiences for Undergraduates
Why Do Science?Watching Al Uy in the Solomon Islands, you might think science is all about adventures in exotic locations. But it's more than that. We asked several scientists why doing science is important. Here's what they had to say.Produced by Day's Edge Productions, with music by New West Studios (newweststudios.com/).For the full story of Dr. Al Uy and his research on the origins of new species in the Solomon Islands, watch "Islands of Creation" on the Smithsonian Channel: smithsonianchannel.com/shows/islands-of-creation/0/3421513
Explaining Speciation Research in PijinEvery year, Dr. Al Uy visits local schools in the Makira Province of the Solomon Islands to talk about science and conservation. What happens when Al explains his research in the local language, Solomon Islands Pijin? Watch and find out!Produced by Day's Edge Productions, with music by New West Studios (newweststudios.com/).For the full story of Dr. Al Uy and his research on the origins of new species in the Solomon Islands, watch "Islands of Creation" on the Smithsonian Channel: smithsonianchannel.com/shows/islands-of-creation/0/3421513
Humbled in the Jungle, Episode 1: FireOn an filming expedition to a remote part of the Solomon Islands, "Islands of Creation" filmmakers Neil & Nate learn from locals what it takes to make a fire in the rain, using only wood and elbow grease.Film by: Days Edge Productions (daysedgeproductions.com)Facebook: facebook.com/pages/Days-Edge-Productions/132249730176458Music:"Maybe" by DoKashiteru"Clade Connection" by Morgantj"Fishes in the Sea" by: Scomber"Quittin Time" by Patrick LeeThank you so much to our Sponsors:JAG35 (jag35.com/)ThinkTank (thinktankphoto.com/)The National Science Foundation (NSF.gov)Footage captured while filming Islands of Creation, an NSF-funded film following the research of Dr. Al Uy, who studies how new species are born. Islands of Creation is coming soon.
Humbled in the Jungle Episode 2: COCONUTSOn a filming expedition to a remote part of the Solomon Islands, "Islands of Creation" filmmakers Neil & Nate learn from locals what it takes to climb coconut trees. It's safe to say that not all adventures end well for everyone.Film by: Days Edge Productions (daysedgeproductions.com)Facebook: facebook.com/pages/Days-Edge-Productions/132249730176458Music:"Snowball" by Moby"Clade Connection" by Morgantj"Fishes in the Sea" by: Scomber"Quittin Time" by Patrick LeeThank you so much to our Sponsors:JAG35 (jag35.com/)ThinkTank (thinktankphoto.com/)The National Science Foundation (NSF.gov)Footage captured while filming Islands of Creation, an NSF-funded film following the research of Dr. Al Uy, who studies how new species are born. Islands of Creation is coming soon.
SYMBIOSIS - Episode 1: Symbiotic Super PowersSYMBIOSIS is a series of short films exploring the amazing science of symbiosis, a mutually beneficial relationship between two or more species. In Episode 1, “Symbiotic Super Powers,” learn what symbiosis is, discover why it’s so important for life on Earth, and meet some of the scientists who are working hard to understand it. Symbiosis! 
Water In The BorderlandsThe Rio Grande/Bravo runs thousands of miles through the expansive Chihuahuan Desert. It forms the US-Mexico border from El Paso, Texas, to the Gulf of Mexico. But climate change is impacting life in the river basin. We shot and edited this video for the World Wildlife Fund in February, 2015. What a pleasure to work with their team and their partners on the ground.Produced by: Day's Edge ProductionsMusic by: Aaron LeederTo find out more about WWF's initiatives in the borderlands see: worldwildlife.org/videos/water-in-the-borderlands
Saving the SandhillsThe Switzers have been ranching cattle in the Nebraska Sandhills for more than a century, but will they be able to keep ranching on their land? Cattle ranching has never been very lucrative, and it’s more challenging today than ever. To keep the family together, the Switzers take a gamble and start an ecotourism business. An unlikely ally, the Greater Prairie-Chicken, quickly becomes their star attraction. If the Switzers can manage their ranch to preserve the native grasslands, the prairie-chickens will thrive and attract nature lovers from far and wide – and ultimately keep the family on the land they love.Produced by Day's Edge Productions for World Wildlife FundMusic by SJ and Dan Warren
Saving America's Grasslands
America's Ranchers: Protectors of our Grasslands
Congo Basin Institute (CBI)UCLA and the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) are spearheading the launch of the Congo Basin Institute (CBI), a new interdisciplinary research center in Yaounde, Cameroon that will serve all of Central Africa. We visited Cameroon in July 2014 and produced this short promotional video to help UCLA and IITA's fundraising efforts. Learn more about the project, including how to support the CBI, at:environment.ucla.edu/ctr/initiatives/cbi/Music by New West Studios and Henri Dikongue.
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